Opportunity Not Taken

Individual opportunities are TIME-SENSITIVE and FINITE.

They come and go quickly, like lightning. The difference? We’ve debunked the myth about lightning never striking in the same spot twice. Opportunity, on the other hand, is one and done.

Bad news: An opportunity not taken does not have a neutral effect. It is a net loss. After 5 years of not acting on opportunities, you will not break even. It is failure. The sum of consistent bad decisions lands you somewhere short of your desired outcome. Maybe it’s worth lowering the expectations that you created for yourself. Maybe not. Nonetheless, we all have an ideal lifestyle that we aim for. Every time lightning strikes and you don’t find a way to bottle it, your future, better-self, winces in agony.

Good news: The flow of opportunities is never-ending. While no one opportunity will ever resurface a second time the same, it’s purposeless to dwell on having missed a single one. There are fresh opportunities sandwiched between each passing moment of our busy lives. Your next opportunity might be more powerful than the previous. It also might not be. Opportunity is one of the most uncertain, uncontrollable contributors to our lives, it is not to be taken lightly. Be prepared to take action. The next chance is your best chance.

Infinite opportunities, finite amount of time to act on each one, and never knowing the difference.

No matter how predictable an outcome, you will only ever know the results of made choices. You can never truly quantify the positive or negative implications of passing on an opportunity, but one things is certain:

In choosing to ACT ON OPPORTUNITY, success is as viable as failure, so you might as well try. 

5 Thoughts that People (who stress about family and travel) Should Keep in Mind Over the Holidays

This post is about: #family, #holidays, #stresstips  |  Read time: 3 min


If you have the perfect family, and the perfect life, disregard this blog and go enjoy your break.

If you’re like the majority, where dealing with family and travel adds some level of unnecessary stress over the holidays, this might help:

  1. MODERATION: Reminisce, indulge in laughter, stuff yourself with joy, but in all else, keep moderation in mind. “Too much” means something different to all of us, so be sound in your own judgement. People frequently regret eating too much, drinking too much, arguing too much, etc. The holidays are a time to relax your standards, but gluttony rarely results in happiness.
  2. COMPOSURE: Family can test your patience. Stay composed. Travel adversity can break you down. Stay composedNegative emotions multiply quickly. Stay composed.
  3. AUTONOMY: You are not your family. You are an individual part of your family. This should resonate specifically with young adults still struggling to find an identity of their own. You are not your parents. You are not your grandparents. Staying respectful and cognizant of your families culture is essential, but not at the cost of your own well-being. If it means renting an AirBnb instead of sleeping on a blowup mattress next to your snoring uncle, or sneaking out with your fiance for a drink when everyone else is bickering, TAKE CARE OF YOU FIRST! Unhealthy habits are NOT something that you need to partake in just because your family considers it normal. You do you. You can’t bring joy to others when, personally, you feel miserable.
  4. BE PRESENT: Put your phone away. Engage in conversation. Show some interest in people. You’d be shocked how much pertinent wisdom your family members can share with you. It feels good to detach from pop culture for a bit, really, it does.
  5. PERSPECTIVE: When you really think about it, holiday gatherings are the most (and maybe only) memorable times that you’ll have with family. Make the most of it while you can. At the end of the day, you have the luxury of going back to your own routine soon enough. Family is about sacrifice. Make others smile, even if it’s at your own expense. It’s not about you. We all fight our own battles. Showing empathy can give you great perspective with your family. Don’t boil over when you start to get heated. Put it on low and simmer down. Bite the bullet. Hold your tongue. Smile more. Even if it takes some fortitude, be the light for your family this holiday season. Odds are, some of them might be having as hard a time hanging out with you as you are with them 😉 You might even find common ground there, haha.  Spread love, I hear it’s contagious this time of year.

 

HAPPY HOLIDAYS EVERYONE

LOVE OVER EVERYTHING,

4 Poor Choices College Basketball Players Will Make This Holiday Break

This post is about: #collegebasketball, #holidaybreak, #practice  |  Read time: 2 min


Most college basketball (CBB) players won’t even take the time to read this. Odds are, if you’ve clicked on the link, you’re a coach or a fan.

MOST players will make poor choices over the holiday break. FEW will not. Those few will reap the benefits later.

For those that do not know the process, here it is. Once final exams are finished, usually first or second week of December, college basketball players practice, travel, and play throughout the break, which usually lasts about 3-4 weeks. They only get a few days to celebrate the Holidays. This is their time to live like a professional player, something that many players aspire to and CLAIM that they are working toward, but few are willing to stay disciplined enough to achieve.

Here are the primary mistakes that college hoopers will make this Holiday Break.

  1. NO CLASS, NO ROUTINE – late nights, late mornings, less rhythm, more groggy, more sleepy, and less focused. Routine can be a good thing. Sloth and negativity tend to creep into an idle mind. KEEP A ROUTINE!
  2. PARTY TIME – pretty self explanatory here. Drinking destroys your body. Staying up late destroys your body. Eating fast food destroys your body. If you finished finals week and you’ve got M-F party plans, your game is going to suffer. Priorities. Check out this article about how Drinking effects your performance.
  3. “I CAN NAP LATER” – Naps are great, but they don’t replace your normal sleep cycles. Just because you don’t have to get up for class doesn’t mean you should stay up all night. You’re muscles do not recover properly, you become injury prone, your energy levels go down, and your level of alertness come game time will suffer. Do not stay up till 3am now just because you don’t have 8am class. Sleep is your charger. Most of you wouldn’t walk 15 feet out your dorm without a phone charger in your bag. Why would you not want to recharge your body if that’s what is giving you a scholarship. This is something that pros begin to understand very well as they get older and need that sleep just to function. Holiday break is a time to catch up on sleep, not get behind. Check out this article from Fatigue Science.
  4. DID NOT IMPROVE – this is a choice, and it largely sums up the other points. If you do not take advantage of your free time, you are falling behind. BREAK SHOULD BE FUN! But if you have goals and dreams of dancing come March, THIS HOLIDAY BREAK SHOULD BE SEEN AS AN OPPORTUNITY TO REST, RELAX, and IMPROVE! Get in the gym and master a skill that you’ve been struggling with. Or if you’ve been turning the ball over, go to the gym and do some handling drills. Free throws are another great thing to work on over break. A telltale sign that your team took the holiday break seriously (or not) is when you see the FT% change during that time. It should go up slightly. More time to work…

It’s a simple game. You get out of it what you put in. Those who want it bad enough will be working toward a Championship in March.

You do not plant a tomato seed in the morning and eat tomatoes that night. 

Plant some seeds this break. Feast in March.


 

If you are a player that happened to read through this entire article, good for you. Shameless plug here… I have some staff and coaches at my company, Master Your Craft, that would love to offer up some advice on how to improve your game over the break if you are willing to invest in that. I personally do performance coaching as well. If interested, click one of the social links below and get in touch with me. We can do sport specific drills, nutrition, sleep, strength & conditioning, and just about anything else you can think of. My people are very good. Or, if you aren’t sure that paying for a 1v1 session is worth your while, you can also reach out and ask questions. We do Q&A’s pretty frequently.

Our goal is simple. We want to help you MASTER YOUR CRAFT. Whatever tools, resources, or advice that you may need. We have it. Click below to contact me.

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Winter is Coming

This post is about: #finance, #preparedness, #theinuit  |  Read time: 2 min


Finance and The Inuit are two topics that I am only averagely versed in.

I am no layman, though. I study.

  1. I plan to make money — financial objective.
  2. I plan NOT to freeze to death in the CanadianArctic — just a general objective.

That said, I refuse to be someone unprepared for the long, wintery ‘bear market’ that is sure to come after this 7.5 year long ‘bull market’ finally ends. The majority of you will fuss about the market ruining you, and tragically, the prepared minority won’t have much sympathy. If you know something bad is looming, prepare for it. Pretty simple logic.

Prepare for winter, don’t react to it.

You’ve been blessed with this knowledge. The burden is yours to educate yourself now, or to wipe your tears later.

“People love to say that knowledge is power. But the truth is that knowledge is only potential power. You and I both know that it’s useless if you don’t act on it.” – Tony Robbins

Start with this book by Tony Robbins.

I did, and while I’m still no expert, I feel a whole lot more secure about my financial future than I did before reading it.

Start there. Start anywhere. Just don’t grizzle and grumble to me about your frostbitten fingers if you’ve never read up on how the Inuit keep warm in the winter.

Approval, Access, & Opportunity

This post is about: #aspirations, #opportunity, #socialdisconnect  |  Read time: 2 min


Teachers, managers, owners, bosses, coaches, parents, or other people in positions of authority, privilege, or power, are often seeking to mentor or train-in a “worthwhile” candidate. Finding a young successor helps to ensure the future existence of their world-views. It’s a legacy thing.

Many young folks seek the approval of these established persons, both for access and for opportunity.

Why is there a disconnect? Why do managers have a hard time finding good employees while there are so many employees who all desire the approval of these leaders.

To go from zero to leadership position is a tiresome process. It is not given. It is earned. It is not the snap of your fingers, it is the slow freezing of your bare hands after cleaning the gutters in 15 degree weather.

Young folks aspiring to something ‘greater’, understand the importance of these things if you want to please your superior, and eventually, become that person who masters their craft and can mentor others:

If you want approval, access, and opportunity,

There’s a level of scrutiny that you submit yourself to. Don’t be sensitive.

There’s a  level of attention to detail.

There’s a  level of necessary worry and concern.

There’s a  level of engagement.

There’s a  level of composure.

There’s a  level of initiative.

There’s a  level of IQ.

There’s a  level of responsibility.

There’s a  level of consistency.

There’s a  level of persistence.

There’s a level of growth.

There’s a  level of focus.

There is a lot required of you before you can get approval, access, and opportunity from those in the position to dish it out. So, first, decide if that’s what you really want. Then, act accordingly.

#1 Jakob Gollon: Grass-Fed Water Buffalo & Alpaca Farming w/ David Carrell | Category: Health

Interview run time: 24 mins

Category: Health

DAVID CARRELL  |  Carrell Farms Inc.  |  Monroe, GA


What we covered in the interview:

  • The UNeducating process that David went through
  • Grass-Fed Farming
  • Water Buffalo vs. Cattle
  • Factory Farming downfalls
  • Untraditional livestock
  • The “Organic” certification process

Mentions in this interview:
Ryan Munsey
Michael Pollan 
The Stockman Grass Farmer
Williamsburg Packing
Bistro Off Broad